The Greening of the Nursery

The foliage is finally coming out on the plants here at Verbinnen’s Nursery. It’s been a late spring, at least a week later than average, and about two or three weeks later than last year, when the season was especially early.

Sugar Maple in 1 Gallon Pots

Sugar Maple (Acer saccharum) in 1 Gallon Pots



These sugar maple (Acer saccharum) are looking great! They are on hold for our own production, slated to move up into 3 gallon pots.

Willow (Salix sp.) greening up quickly

These willows (Salix sp.) are greening up quickly



These willows (Salix sp.) are excellent for wetter areas. They are excellent food sources for native insects, supporting a variety of different species. These insects in turn are an excellent food source for migrating and breeding birds.

There are also a few species beginning to flower. The cherries (Prunus sp.) and service berries (Amelanchier sp.) are the first to show their buds.

Pin cherry (Prunus pensylvanica) flowers

Pin cherry (Prunus pensylvanica) flowers



Pin cherry (Prunus pensylvanica) is an early successional species, growing quickly in disturbed environments. This makes it useful as a nurse crop over other tree saplings that prefer shade, such as sugar maple (Acer saccharum) or white pine (Pinus strobus).

Allegheny Serviceberry (Amelanchier laevis) flowers

Allegheny Serviceberry (Amelanchier laevis) flowers



Allegheny Serviceberry (Amelanchier laevis) is also called smooth serviceberry. It also has sweet tasting fruit that attracts birds and makes great pies!

It’s a great time to be out in the nursery, seeing the different stages of development of the leaves and flowers. As an employee, it’s a unique opportunity to learn to recognize native plants in a variety of stages of development.

If you’d like a chance to do some learning yourself, feel free to drop by. We’d be happy to show you around!

Peter Scholtens – Sales and Service, Verbinnen’s Nursery

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